Wednesday , 3 June 2020

Eid al Fitr

Many Muslims often bring prayer rugs to the Mosque on Eid al-Fitr. Photo: Azeri

Did you know that today is the Muslim holiday of Eid al fitr?

Eid al-Fitr is the “Festival of Breaking the Fast“, is a religious holiday celebrated by Muslims worldwide that concludes the month-long Fast of Ramadan, during which Muslims refrained from eating from sunup to sundown. This religious Eid (holiday) is the only day in the month of Shawwal during which Muslims are not permitted to fast.

“Eid” is Arabic for a festive time, and “Fitr” means “break the fast”. Often referred to as “Little Eid” (as opposed to the “Big Eid” of Eid Al-Adha). People don their best clothes for prayers and often pay “zadak”, or charity, and recite one of Islam’s central tenets, Allahu Akbar – “Allah is Great.” And if you’re in the Muslim Quarter of Jerusalem’s Old City at this time, you just might catch young Muslim men and boys celebrating by horse racing!

What is Eid al-Fitr? Ramadan & the Festival of Breaking the Fast

Eid Al-Fitr is an important Islamic holiday and marks the end of Ramadan. Meet some kids who tell us about their religion and how they’ll be celebrating Eid.

Beautiful Eid takbir -Eid al fitr

The Takbir  “magnification [of God]” is the Arabic phrase ʾAllāhu ʾakbaru  “Allah is greater [than everything]”.

It is a common Islamic Arabic expression, used in various contexts by Muslims; in formal Salah (prayer) and in the Adhan (Islamic call to prayer).

Today, on Eid al fitr, I can hear this version of the Takbir prayer coming from the mosque in the Israeli-Bedouin village (Rumet el Heib) two km from my home. Each participant has a turn to recite the Takbir.

Eid al-Fitr greetings to Israeli Muslims

About Israel and You

Cameling in the holy land since forever